heteroglossia
Kierkegaard may shout in warning: “If man had no eternal consciousness, if, at the bottom of everything, there were merely a wild, seething force producing everything, both large and trifling, in the storm of dark passions, if the bottomless void that nothing can fill underlay all things, what would life be but despair?” This cry is not likely to stop the absurd man. Seeking what is true is not seeking what is desirable. If in order to elude the anxious question: “What would life be?” one must, like the donkey, feed on the roses of illusion, then the absurd mind, rather than resigning itself to falsehood, prefers to adopt fearlessly Kierkegaard’s reply: “despair.”

Albert Camus, The Myth of Sisyphus


[And what is life but despair?]

(via heteroglossia)

communicants

JENKINS: How many takes did you do of each scene?
MARIE RIVIÈRE: Always just one. The most amazing thing is that, during the shooting, none of us saw any rushes or  footage. There were only three of us. Rohmer, Françoise Etchegaray, who was a producer, Sophie Maintigneux who was cinematographer and Claudine Nougaret who was sound. There was just four people behind the camera, so no-one had time to go back to Paris to visit the laboratories and watch to see if everything was OK. At the end of summer, in September, Eric finally discovered what he had filmed. He hadn’t seen a thing. It was really great because, he ended up using nearly everything he had shot.
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JENKINS: Did you always know you would get the green ray?
MARIE RIVIÈRE: Yes. Yes, yes, yes. It was decided before we started filming. He gave me the book by Jules Verne, but I don’t think I ever read it. I didn’t want to read it because he’d already told me what happens in the end. The two lovers, instead of looking at the green ray rising up from the sea, they look at each other. Which is a mistake, because the water rises up over them and they’re drowned. So I said, “Oh no, I can’t read that!” But then he told me he wanted to tell the story, but with a more positive spin. The lovers look at the green ray together, and it’s a gift to them. As he had already told me the end, I didn’t want to read the book. He wanted me also to read Dostoevsky’s The Idiot, which is what Delphine reads on the beach. But I don’t think I read that either.
[Mubi]

JENKINS: How many takes did you do of each scene?

MARIE RIVIÈRE: Always just one. The most amazing thing is that, during the shooting, none of us saw any rushes or  footage. There were only three of us. Rohmer, Françoise Etchegaray, who was a producer, Sophie Maintigneux who was cinematographer and Claudine Nougaret who was sound. There was just four people behind the camera, so no-one had time to go back to Paris to visit the laboratories and watch to see if everything was OK. At the end of summer, in September, Eric finally discovered what he had filmed. He hadn’t seen a thing. It was really great because, he ended up using nearly everything he had shot.

-

JENKINS: Did you always know you would get the green ray?

MARIE RIVIÈRE: Yes. Yes, yes, yes. It was decided before we started filming. He gave me the book by Jules Verne, but I don’t think I ever read it. I didn’t want to read it because he’d already told me what happens in the end. The two lovers, instead of looking at the green ray rising up from the sea, they look at each other. Which is a mistake, because the water rises up over them and they’re drowned. So I said, “Oh no, I can’t read that!” But then he told me he wanted to tell the story, but with a more positive spin. The lovers look at the green ray together, and it’s a gift to them. As he had already told me the end, I didn’t want to read the book. He wanted me also to read Dostoevsky’s The Idiot, which is what Delphine reads on the beach. But I don’t think I read that either.

[Mubi]